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Howard F. Wilkins III (“Chip”)

Howard F. Wilkins III (“Chip”)

Partner

Mr. Wilkins joined the firm in 2005 and became a partner in 2010.  His practice focuses on land use and environmental law.  Mr. Wilkins handles all phases of the land use entitlement and permitting processes, including administrative approvals and litigation.  Mr. Wilkins’s practice covers the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), the State Planning and Zoning Law, the Subdivision Map Act, the Williamson Act, the California Endangered Species Act, the California Native Plant Protection Act, the Brown Act, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the federal Endangered Species Act, the federal Clean Water Act, waste management, water law, administrative law, as well as initiative and referendum law.

Prior to joining the firm, Mr. Wilkins was an associate attorney in the complex litigation and litigation groups at Kronick, Moskovitz, Tiedemann & Girard, where he represented public and private clients in state and federal court proceedings involving a broad range of matters, including inverse condemnation, eminent domain, contracts, products liability, unfair competition, and class actions. While working at Kronick, Mr. Wilkins volunteered for a month at the Yolo County District Attorney’s office, handling hearings, bench trials and a jury trial. Before entering law school, he served in various positions in the political arena, including research director for a state political party, political consultant and campaign manager.

Mr. Wilkins regularly teaches land use and environmental continuing education classes and seminars for organizations such as the State Bar of California, Law Seminars International, and Association of Environmental Professionals. He also regularly speaks at conferences and meetings, such as the annual Environmental Law Conference at Yosemite.

Representative matters include:

  • Outside counsel to Marina Coast Water District for review under CEQA of water and land use projects and in litigation defending a challenge to a proposed annexation.  Mr. Wilkins also currently represents the District in challenges relating to well permits and a large desalination plant.
  • Representing Homewood Village Resorts LLC, JMA Ventures LLC, Squaw Valley Resort LCC, Mountainside Partners LLC, and Kila Lodge LLC, in separate matters navigating CEQA, the Tahoe Regional Planning Compact, and land use entitlement processes to obtain permits from Placer County and the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, as well as litigation in federal and California courts.
  • Outside counsel defending Yuba County Water Agency in federal Endangered Species Act cases.  The current case involves a challenge to several Biological Opinions regarding Central Valley spring-run Chinook salmon, Central Valley steelhead, and southern Distinct Population Segment of North American green sturgeon on the Yuba River. In prior cases, the plaintiffs alleged separate Section 9 “take” violations against the Agency.
  • Represented Tahoe Regional Planning Agency in defense of challenge to its adoption of Regional Plan in the United States Court for the Eastern District of California and Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.
  • Represented Treasure Island Community Development, LLC and San Francisco Waterfront Partners II, LLC in separate matters navigating CEQA and land use entitlement processes to obtain permits from the City and County of San Francisco and the State Lands Commission, as well as litigation in California superior and appellate courts.
  • Represented County of Contra Costa in defense of two challenges to its CUPA Hazardous Waste Generator program fees and refund claims.  Successfully settled the matter after filing demurrer on behalf of County. The case settled on favorable terms for the County, and the fees remained valid.
  • Represented large retailer in successfully navigating CEQA and local land use entitlement processes to obtain a conditional use permit for home improvement store. Despite vocal opposition during the permitting process, the project did not draw any litigation. The entitlements sought included a tentative parcel map, design review, demolition permit, grading permit, building permits, encroachment permit from Caltrans, Asbestos Dust Mitigation Plan, approval for a piped canal, National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit, Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification, and Nationwide 404 Permit.
  • Represented California Department of Fish and Game (now Department of Fish and Wildlife) in defense of petition for a writ of mandate and declaratory relief claims relating to whether it was exempt from annual water-related assessments. The case was settled on favorable terms for the Department as it was not required to pay any past or future assessments and incurred no financial obligations to the plaintiffs.
  • Represented clients in administrative hearings, including the California Energy Commission, Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board, and State Water Resources Control Board.
  • Represented start-up companies in connection with proposals to site and obtain entitlements for proposed anaerobic digester facilities that transform organic waste into biogas fuel (hydrogen, methane), as well as biofuel, solar, and other clean energy projects.  Assisting clients in consultations with stakeholders and advising on environmental review process.  Assisted clients in successfully obtaining millions in grant funding.

Published Decisions:

  • Friends of the River v. National Marine Fisheries Service (E.D. Cal., July 18, 2017, No. 216CV00818JAMEFB) 2017 WL 3034700 (Federal Endangered Species Act).
  • Sierra Club v. Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (Tahoe Regional Planning Compact)
    • 840 F.3d 1106 (9th Cir. 2016)
    • 2014 WL 1366253 (E.D. Cal., Apr. 7, 2014) and
    • 2013 WL 3070632 (E.D. Cal. June 17, 2013).
  • Defend Our Waterfront v. California State Lands Commission (2015) 240 Cal.App.4th 570 (CEQA).
  • Citizens for a Sustainable Treasure Island v. City and County of San Francisco (2014) 227 Cal.App.4th 1036 (CEQA).
  • Alliance for the Protection of the Auburn Community Environment v. County of Placer (2013) 215 Cal.App.4th 25 (CEQA).
  • Sierra Club v. Tahoe Reg’l Planning Agency, 916 F.Supp.2d 1098 (E.D. Cal.2013) (Tahoe Regional Planning Compact, CEQA).
  • Citizens for Open Government/ Lodi First v. City of Lodi (2012) 205 Cal.App.4th 296 (CEQA).
  • S. Yuba River Citizens League v. Nat’l Marine Fisheries Serv. (Federal Endangered Species Act)
    • 851 F. Supp. 2d 1246 (E.D. Cal. 2012);
    • 629 F. Supp. 2d 1123 (E.D. Cal. 2009); and
    • 257 F.R.D. 607 (E.D. Cal. 2009).

Education

  • J.D., University of California, Davis, 1999
    B.S., Political Science, Santa Clara University, 1995

Professional Affiliations

  • State Bar of California
    • Member
    • Environmental Law Section Chair (2015-2016) and Executive Committee Member (2010-2016); Advisor (2016-2017)
  • California Lawyers Association
    • Board of Directors, Vice Chair and member (2018-present)
    • Environmental Law Section Executive Committee Advisor and Representative to Board of Directors (2018-present)
    • Environmental Law Section member
  • Admitted to all California State Courts
  • U.S. District Courts, Northern, Eastern and Central Districts of California
  • United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit
  • Sacramento County Bar Association
    • Environmental Law Section member
    • Executive Committee (2010-2015), Chair (2014-2015)
    • Selected for inclusion in Northern California Super Lawyers® magazine in 2018 & 2019

Community Involvement

  • Master of the Bench, Schwartz/Levi Inn of Court
  • Board Member and Vice-President, Harry S. Truman Club

Tiffany K. Wright

Tiffany K. Wright

Managing Partner

Ms. Wright joined the firm in 2000 and became a partner in 2006.  Ms. Wright represents public agencies and private applicants in a variety of land use and environmental law matters.  Ms. Wright handles all phases of the land use entitlement and permitting processes, including administrative approvals and litigation.  Her practice covers the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), the State Planning and Zoning Law, the Subdivision Map Act, the Williamson Act, the California Endangered Species Act, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the federal Endangered Species Act, and the federal Clean Water Act provisions associated with wetlands permitting.

Ms. Wright teaches several land use and environmental law continuing education classes and seminars each year for professional organizations such as the Association of Environmental Professionals and Law Seminars International. She also regularly speaks at conferences and meetings, such as conferences for the California Chapter of the American Planning Association, the California Association of Environmental Professionals, the League of California Cities, the County Counsels’ Association of California and the American Public Transportation Association.

Representative matters include:

  • Outside counsel to the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority for CEQA review of several transit and transportation projects and in litigation challenging the approval of the Crenshaw/LAX transit line, the Regional Connector transit line, and the Westside Subway transit line.
  • Outside counsel to the Port of Los Angeles for CEQA review of various projects to implement the Port’s Master Plan.
  • Representing Richland Communities for several large specific plan projects, including the Lincoln Village 5 Specific Plan, a 4,943-acre mixed-use development in western Placer County.
  • Counsel to Friant Ranch, LP in litigation over the adequacy of Fresno County’s EIR for the Friant Ranch Specific Plan, decided by the California Supreme Court on December 24, 2018.
  • Outside counsel to Calaveras County and Tuolumne County in the updates of their general plans.

Published Cases

  • Sierra Club v. County of Fresno (2018) __ Cal.5th ___ (Supreme Court Case No. S219783).
  • Neighbors for Smart Rail v. Exposition Metro Line Construction Authority (2013) 57 Cal.4th 439.
  • Japanese Village, LLC v. Federal Transit Administration, 843 F.3d 445 (9th Cir. 2016).
  • Beverly Hills Unified School District v. Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (2015) 241 Cal.App.4th 627.
  • South County Citizens for Smart Growth v. County of Nevada (2013) 221 Cal.App.4th 316.
  • Sustainable Transportation Advocates of Santa Barbara v. Santa Barbara County Association of Governments (2009) 179 Cal.App.4th 113.
  • St. Vincent’s School for Boys, Catholic Charities CYO v. City of San Rafael (2008) 161 Cal.App.4th 989.
  • CalBeach Advocates v. City of Solana Beach (2002) 103 Cal.App.4th 529.

Education

  • J.D., University of California, Davis, King Hall School of Law, 2000
  • B.S., Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, 1995

Professional Affiliations

  • State Bar of California
    • Environmental Law Section
  • Admitted to all California State Courts
  • U.S. District Court, all California Districts
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit
  • Sacramento County Bar Association
  • Association of Environmental Professionals
  • Selected as a Super Lawyer in 2018 & 2019 and as a Rising Star in the 2009 & 2010 Northern California Super Lawyers® magazine

Christopher Luke Stiles

Christopher Luke Stiles

Partner

Mr. Stiles joined the firm in 2012 as an associate and became a partner in December 2018.  His practice focuses on land use and environmental law, with emphasis on the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), the State Planning and Zoning Law, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Endangered Species Act, the California Endangered Species Act, air and water quality, natural resources, wetlands, and related matters. He handles all phases of the land use entitlement and permitting processes, including administrative approvals and litigation.

Before joining Remy Moose Manley, LLP, Mr. Stiles worked as a graduate fellow at the California Energy Commission, where he worked on a number of land use and environmental issues relating to energy in California, including the siting and licensing of new power-plant projects. While in law school, he clerked with the California Environmental Protection Agency, the California Department of Fish and Game (now Department of Fish and Wildlife), and the Delta Stewardship Council.

Mr. Stiles has worked on an array of cases involving various state and federal land use and environmental laws. His representative matters include:

  • Associate counsel representing California Department of Water Resources in the preparation of an Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Study (EIR/EIS) and related litigation for a water conveyance project in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta known as the California WaterFix.
  • Associate counsel representing California High-Speed Rail Authority in on-going preparation of multiple EIR/EISs for the statewide high-speed train project. Assisted in litigation defending EIR prepared for Merced-to-Fresno section of the project.
  • Represented GSW Arena LLC as associate counsel in litigation challenging an EIR and various entitlements for an event center and mixed-use development project proposed by the Golden State Warriors of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Assisted in successful defense on appeal before the First District Court of Appeal (Mission Bay Alliance v. Office of Community Investment and Infrastructure (2016) 6 Cal.App.5th 160).
  • Represented the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency as associate counsel in challenge to Tahoe Area Regional Plan and associated environmental review. Assisted in successful defense on appeal before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (Sierra Club v. Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (9th Cir. 2016) 840 F.3d 1106).
  • Associate counsel representing public agencies and private developers through environmental review and litigation for various commercial, residential, and mixed-use development projects.

Mr. Stiles teaches several land use and environmental law continuing education classes and seminars each year for professional organizations such as the Association of Environmental Professionals.

Education

  • J.D., University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law, 2011 (Environmental Law Concentration)
  • B.A., Political Science (minor in Urban Studies & Planning), University of California, San Diego, 2004

Professional Affiliations

  • State Bar of California
    • Environmental Law Section
  • Sacramento County Bar Association
    • Environmental Law Section
  • California State Courts
  • U.S. District Courts (Northern, Eastern and Central Districts)
  • United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit
  • California Climate Change Law and Policy Reporter, Editorial Board, 2015-2016
  • California Land Use Law and Policy Reporter, Editorial Board, 2016-present
  • Selected for inclusion in the Rising Stars sections of the 2017-2019 Northern California Super Lawyers® magazine

Casey A. Shorrock

Casey A. Shorrock

Associate

Ms. Shorrock joined the firm as an associate in 2019. Her practice focuses on environmental and land use law and includes CEQA, NEPA, natural resources, endangered species and wetlands, air and water quality, climate change, wildfire prevention regulation, and local environmental and land use ordinances. Ms. Shorrock specializes in environmental document review and consultant oversight.

Prior to attending law school, Ms. Shorrock had a career as an environmental consultant and planner, working with and for agencies at all levels of government, with special experience working on tribal environmental projects. In this capacity, Ms. Shorrock managed the environmental review process for a variety of development and infrastructure projects and government actions and prepared the requisite state, federal, tribal, and joint environmental documents. She also focused on federal permitting and the streamlining of environmental regulatory compliance. Throughout her years as a consultant and planner, Ms. Shorrock worked closely with private clients, agencies, tribal governments, and the public in several capacities.

During law school, Ms. Shorrock worked for Judge Kimberley J. Mueller at the U.S. District Court, Eastern District of California, on cases involving the Clean Water Act, the Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments, statutes of limitations, and judicial/quasi-judicial immunity. She also worked as a researcher and editor for a UC Davis law school professor on an article testing administrative law theories and was a summer associate for Remy Moose Manley, LLP. As a law student, Ms. Shorrock was awarded the Stauffer Charitable Trust Fellowship for her paper entitled Environmentally Responsible and Streamlined Development in California: The Promise of CEQA’s Class 32 Exemption and Witkin Awards for academic excellence in Environmental Law and Oceans & Coastal Law. Ms. Shorrock attended law school on full scholarship as an Anthony M. Kennedy Fellow.

Education

  • J.D., University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law, 2019 (Water and Environmental Concentration)
  • B.A., Literature, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1999

Professional Affiliations

  • State Bar of California, No. 328414,
    Environmental Law Section
  • U.S. District Court, Eastern District of California
  • Federal Bar Association, Sacramento Chapter
  • California Lawyers Association
  • American Bar Association
  • Sacramento County Bar Association
  • California Association of Environmental Professionals

Bridget K. McDonald

Bridget K. McDonald

Associate

Bridget K. McDonald is an associate attorney in the Sacramento-based boutique law firm of Remy Moose Manley, LLP, which specializes in environmental law, land use and planning, water law, initiatives and referenda, and administrative law generally. Ms. McDonald joined the firm in 2019.

Ms. McDonald’s practice focuses on land use and environmental law, handling all phases of the land use entitlement and permitting processes, including administrative approvals and litigation. Her practice includes the California Environmental Quality Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the State Planning and Zoning Law, natural resources, endangered species, air and water quality, and other land use environmental statutes.

Ms. McDonald received her Bachelor of Arts degree in environmental studies from the University of Southern California in 2012 and her Master of Arts degree from the University of Southern California in 2013. She received her Juris Doctorate from the University of California at Davis, King Hall School of Law in 2019, with a certificate in environmental law and public service law.

During law school, Ms. McDonald was the managing editor of Environs, the Environmental Law and Policy Journal, the symposium chair for the Environmental Law Society, and the co-founder of the Student Animal Legal Defense Fund. Ms. McDonald also served as a research assistant to Professor Richard Frank, professor of environmental practice and director of the California Environmental Law and Policy Center, as well as a teaching assistant for the legal research and writing program. Ms. McDonald participated in the Jeffrey G. Miller National Environmental Law Moot Court Competition, where she advanced to the quarterfinals and won Best Oralist for the first preliminary round. As a law student, Ms. McDonald practiced in the Aoki Water Justice Clinic, and externed for the California Department of Water Resources and the State Water Resources Control Board’s Office of Enforcement.

After graduating from graduate school, Ms. McDonald oversaw the Los Angeles events and outreach department for the national nonprofit organization, Best Friends Animal Society. Just prior to law school, Ms. McDonald worked as a legal assistant for a boutique land use firm in Los Angeles, CA, where she prepared documents for land use entitlements and ongoing CEQA cases.

Education

  • J.D., University of California at Davis, King Hall School of Law, 2019 (Environmental Law and Public Service Certificate)
  • B.A., Environmental Studies, University of Southern California, 2012 (magna cum laude)

Professional Affiliations

  • State Bar of California, No. 327697
  • California Lawyers Association, Environmental Law, Public Law, and Litigation Sections
  • Sacramento County Bar Association, Environmental Law Section
  • Association of Women in Water, Energy and Environment

Sabrina V. Teller

Sabrina V. Teller

Partner

Ms. Teller joined the firm in 2001 and became a partner in December 2006.  Ms. Teller represents public agencies, private applicants, and citizens’ groups in a wide variety of land use and environmental law matters.  Ms. Teller handles all phases of the land use entitlement and permitting processes, from local agency administrative approvals through trial and appellate litigation.  Ms. Teller’s practice includes the California Environmental Quality Act, the State Planning and Zoning Law, the Subdivision Map Act, the Williamson Act, the California Coastal Act, the California Endangered Species Act, the California Water Code provisions relating to water supplies for development, the National Environmental Policy Act, the federal Endangered Species Act, and the federal Clean Water Act provisions associated with wetlands permitting.

Ms. Teller regularly teaches land use and environmental law continuing education classes and seminars for her client agencies and professional organizations such as the Association of Environmental Professionals. She served as an editor for the California Land Use & Policy Reporter from 2005 to 2008. She is currently a contributing author to the quarterly online Environmental Law Updates published by the Environmental Law Section of the California Lawyers Association.

Representative matters include:

  • Outside counsel to the California Board of Forestry and Fire Protection with respect to the preparation of a programmatic environmental impact report for the California Vegetation Treatment Program (Cal VTP), which involves the use of prescribed fires and other techniques to reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire and to restore forest health.
  • Jointly represented the California High-Speed Rail Authority with the California Attorney General’s Office to defend the Authority’s environmental review for individual project segments of the future statewide high-speed train system.
  • Successfully defended the Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board in litigation challenging the environmental review for the Board’s electrification and modernization project to improve the Caltrain commuter rail service on the San Francisco Peninsula.
  • Defended the Santa Cruz County Regional Transportation Commission’s CEQA compliance for a freight rail service contract assignment and rail repair work, upheld by the Santa Cruz County Superior Court.
  • Representing the City of Los Angeles in several ongoing cases defending the City’s compliance with CEQA for various development projects.
  • Representing landowners in Folsom and Roseville in the environmental review and subsequent implementation of specific plans for future residential and commercial development.
  • Defended the San Mateo County Community College District in cases challenging facility improvements at the College of San Mateo. In 2016, the California Supreme Court decided in the District’s favor a key question regarding the standard of review for agency decisions to rely on CEQA’s subsequent review provisions.
  • Defended the City of Monterey’s approval of a city-wide streetlight replacement project for energy efficiency in litigation challenging the City’s reliance on a categorical exemption from CEQA, upheld by the Sixth District Court of Appeal.
  • Represented Renewable Energy Systems (RES) Americas in successfully navigating CEQA, CESA, and local land use entitlement processes to obtain a conditional use permit in November 2008 for a new 103-MW wind power project on private land in Shasta County. Ms. Teller assisted RES in developing a strong biological and cultural resources mitigation program, working cooperatively with the County of Shasta, resource agencies, and environmental and tribal interests to avoid litigation after project approval.
  • Represented Save Our Water Resources, an unincorporated citizens association, in a successful petition for writ of mandate decided in Sacramento County Superior Court regarding the City of Orland’s CEQA compliance for approval of a new water bottling plant.

Reported cases:

  • Hollywoodians Encouraging Rental Opportunities v. City of Los Angeles (2019) 27 Cal.App.5th 768
  • Georgetown Preservation Society v. County of El Dorado (2018) 30 Cal.App.5th 358
  • Westsiders Opposed to Overdevelopment v. City of Los Angeles (2018) 27 Cal.App.5th 1079
  • Friends of the College of San Mateo Gardens v. San Mateo County Community College Dist. (2017) 11 Cal.App.5th 596
  • Friends of the College of San Mateo Gardens v. San Mateo County Community College Dist. (2016) 1 Cal.5th 937
  • Save Our Big Trees v. City of Santa Cruz (2015) 214 Cal.App.4th 694
  • Keep Our Mountains Quiet v. County of Santa Clara (2015) 236 Cal.App.4th 714
  • Citizens for a Green San Mateo v. San Mateo County Community College District (2014) 226 Cal.App.4th 1572
  • California Clean Energy Committee v. City of Woodland (2014) 225 Cal.App.4th 173
  • Habitat and Watershed Caretakers v. City of Santa Cruz (2013) 213 Cal.App.4th 1277
  • Tomlinson v. County of Alameda (2012) 54 Cal.4th 281
  • California Native Plant Society v. City of Rancho Cordova (2009) 172 Cal.App.4th 603.
  • Shasta Resources Council v. U.S. Dept of Interior (E.D.Cal. 2009) 629 F.Supp.2d 1045
  • Vineyard Area Citizens for Responsible Growth, Inc. v. City of Rancho Cordova (2007) 40 Cal.4th 412
  • Friends of the Sierra Railroad v. Tuolumne Park and Recreation Dist. (2007) 147 Cal.App.4th 643
  • Save Our Neighborhood v. Lishman (2006) 140 Cal.App.4th 1288
  • The Pocket Protectors v. City of Sacramento (2004) 124 Cal.App.4th 903
  • Sierra Club v. County of Napa (2004) 121 Cal.App.4th 1490

Education

  • J.D., University of Texas, Austin, 2001
    B.A., Geography, University of Texas, Austin, 1995

Professional Affiliations

  • State Bar of California
    • Environmental Law Section
  • California State Courts
  • U.S. District Courts, all California Districts
  • Sacramento County Bar Association
  • Lead Articles Editor, Texas Environmental Law Journal, 2000-2001
  • Editor, California Land Use & Policy Reporter, 2005-2008
  • Contributing Author, Environmental Law Updates, Environmental Law Section of the California Lawyers Association, 2017-present
  • Selected for inclusion in the 2013-2019 Northern California Super Lawyers® magazine and Rising Stars section of the 2009-2011 Northern California Super Lawyers® magazine

Community Involvement

  • Former Member, Environmental Law Society, University of Texas School of Law
  • Former Member, Public Interest Law Association, University of Texas School of Law
  • Former Board Member, Hugh O’Brien Youth Leadership- Northern California Chapter
  • Former Corporate Board Member, Francis House, Sacramento

Klamath River Renewal Project

Klamath River Renewal Project

The Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC) proposes to take ownership of four PacifiCorp dams on the Klamath River—JC Boyle, Copco, No. 1 & 2, and Iron Gate—and then remove these dams, restore formerly inundated lands, and implement required mitigation measures in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations. Removal of the four hydroelectric dams is the first crucial step to restore the health of the Klamath River and the communities that depend upon it. In order to accomplish these objectives, KRRC must first obtain approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). For the three dams within California (the JC Boyle Dam is in Oregon), KRRC must also obtain the approval of the State Water Resources Control Board. RMM attorney Jim Moose is part of the team of attorneys assisting KRRC with the acquisition of the approvals needed for removal of the three facilities within California.

California Vegetation Treatment Program

California Vegetation Treatment Program

The proposed CalVTP directs implementation of vegetation treatments on public and private land across the state as one component of the state’s efforts to reduce the risk of loss of lives and property, reduce fire suppression costs, and protect natural resources from wildfire. The California Board of Forestry and Fire Protection began analyzing the proposed program in early 2019 to consider and disclose the environmental effects of expanding CalFire’s vegetation treatment activities to cover a total of 250,000 acres per year (up from 33,000 acres per year on average in previous years) to help achieve the Governor’s goal of 500,000 annual acres of treatment on non-federal lands (Executive Order B-52-18). Vegetation treatments include wildland-urban interface fuel reduction, fuel breaks, and ecological restoration, through activities such as prescribed burning, mechanical and manual vegetation removal, prescribed grazing, and herbicides. RMM attorneys Jim Moose and Sabrina Teller advise the Board of Forestry regarding the preparation and certification of a Program EIR for the project.